Tag Archives: marketing

How this Woman Blogged her Way to Six Figures

Tell us a little bit about yourself and your blogging journey.

When I started my blogging career, I was in the middle of a divorce. My husband abandoned our family and I was making a full time living on eBay. I felt there was more to life. eBay didn’t really help people and I love to serve others. All of my friends kept asking me the same questions over and over. How can it be possible I have more than them and they were married and both working, yet I “lived like a queen on so much less than them.”

I started my blog simply answering their questions in the form of posts, so that I didn’t have to keep repeating myself all the time and soon it turned into this huge thing that I had no clue would happen. I stood before the judge telling him, I believed with all my heart I could make $1,000/month in blogging in one year’s time and everyone laughed at me. He told me if I continued, I would lose tens of thousands of dollars in the divorce and that I should get a job outside the home. I obeyed God rather than man and 12 months later, I was earning $10,000/month!

Related: Marketing Tools Entrepreneurs Should Keep Handy

You managed to live on $18K a year, how were you able to do that?

I got absolutely everything I possibly could for free, so that I could afford the things I wanted (a nice home with a garage and big back yard, etc.) I have no debt, so that helps a lot, and I’m obsessed with paying as little as I can for only quality items. I go into detail of my journey from starting out in a homeless shelter to making a fantastic living and becoming debt free in my upcoming book, How to Become Financially Free. Here’s a sneak peek of the introduction.

Give us an example of how you first monetized your blog.

The most important thing a blogger can do is to focus on ONE thing at a time. Yes, it’s slower, but the results are much better.

I first focused on ads because it was easy money and got really good at it. So much so, that I was earning quite a bit and was rocking it. Next, “Focus on traffic,” I thought, “With more traffic, my ads will make me more,” so I turned to Pinterest. I spent 6 months learning every detail I could about Pinterest, testing out my different theory’s, until I hit the answers and my Pinterest started blowing up. Now, companies who are creating Pinterest scheduling programs beg me to use their software. But I won’t budge. I know what works and what doesn’t.

Related: 10 Small Businesses You Can Start Today With Little To No Money

Between making money through ads and getting tons of traffic, my income started doing very well and now I’m studying affiliates inside and out. 🙂 That is what I’m currently working on.

What types of marketing strategies have worked best for you?

The absolute best strategy is to just be yourself. A reader may come to your blog because of a post, and they may stay on the post for 30 seconds because the content is good, the layout of your site is great, and your pictures rock, but they come BACK for YOU. Whether or not they think you can be their friend. It’s all about personal connection. Many bloggers fail because they are too focused on other areas, rather than on serving and being a friend to the reader, serving them and THEIR needs.

A friend is kind, loving, and always tells the truth, even when it’s hard. In blogging, you have to stand up sometimes. Sometimes bloggers lack courage, but that’s what makes a top blogger. Although it’s hard, we have to stand up for what we believe in. There’s an old saying that goes something like this, “If you don’t stand for something, you’ll fall for anything.” Readers don’t want to follow a follower. They want to follow someone holding the torch and leading the way. As bloggers, it’s our responsibility to be that for them. To be a voice for those who don’t have a voice.

Related: Your Startup is Up and Running. What Now?

How do you minimize income peaks and valleys?

Funny you should ask that. No one ever asks and I think it’s a huge missed opportunity. I do have peaks and valleys like everyone else, however, I am able to minimize them by working HARDER than most when everyone else is asleep at the wheel. Very few blogs post every day. I do. In summers, most bloggers take time off, post content very lightly, just take it easy. That’s when I’m working the hardest! The readers are there, and I snatch them all up! When things are crazy busy, that’s when I take time off. During Christmas-time is when most blogs are slammed, but I’m taking a break, because I know the traffic is there and my content is good. I make it a priority to never do anything like anyone else, and that’s how I win at blogging. 🙂

How much are you making annually and what was your big turning point? 

I’m still in my first year of blogging, I haven’t hit 2 years old yet, so I can’t really know an annual number for a little while longer, but I can say that within 12 months of my blogging, I was making $10,000/month. Projected total should be 6 figures a year no problem.

I don’t think I’ve had one major turning point. I believe gaining momentum is about layers. I do something, I gain a ton of traffic and those that don’t connect with me fall off and I keep some to become friends … I’ll be featured somewhere, or guest post somewhere, or have a post that goes viral, and again, get a ton of traffic and keep friends. It’s kind of like a funnel. Everyone goes in, the ones that I can help, stay. Those that stay, I bend over backwards to help. One reader asks me to post on something and I will. I still answer all my own emails. I’m incredibly personable in that way.

Related: Your Startup is Up and Running. What Now?Top 10 Crowdfunding Sites

What advice do you have for other women who want to start their own online business on a shoestring budget?

Get personalized one-on-one coaching right away. You won’t see the value in it, but you’ll lose more money by NOT doing it. I wasted months of blogging and thousands of dollars being scammed. Putting money where it wasn’t smart. I just followed everyone’s advice. I didn’t know who was good and who was bad. Who was reputable and who was a scam. Check the Alexa score. The lower the number, the more you can trust the advice.

Get coaching to get a road map of exactly where you want to go your first year. It’ll shave off months, even years of your own trial and error and get you earning income super fast. One-on-one coaching is something I offer on my site. You can find more information about it here. Just remember to always check the Alexa score before you buy time with a coach and it HAS TO BE personalized coaching. What works for one blog most likely won’t work for another.

As a busy single mom and entrepreneur, how do you manage all of your personal and business activities?

I probably don’t sleep as much as I should. Sometimes it takes being super creative. The whole reason I work from home as a single mom is to be with my kids. I can’t let working from home eat up my time FROM my kids. At the same time, I’m the sole provider of our family. To have a roof over our heads, I have to make money. It’s definitely a balance. Thankfully, I have a wonderful team now that helps. My assistant Katie, my assistant who helps with editing Becky, my design technician Laura, and my contributors. All truly amazing women that I’m honored to be a part of their lives.

Related: Hobby or Startup? Important When Filing Your Taxes

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CMG Business Group…. Propelling Industry to New Heights!

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Generate More Leads!

Every person reading this blog has some sort of business goal they want to accomplish in 2016. Maybe it’s a revenue goal. Maybe you want to work with more “ideal” clients or customers, rather than the accounts you’ve been serving.

Regardless of what industry you’re in, there are probably certain business objectives you want to achieve this year.

I’ll let you in on a little secret: To achieve those goals, you are going to need a certain number of leads!

Inbound marketing has become a primary way for businesses of all shapes and sizes to obtain the quantity and quality of leads they need to achieve their goals. In fact, 93 percent of businesses using inbound marketing see an increase in lead generation.

Related: Seven Secrets of Self-Made Millionaires

Lead Generation Offers

However, not all inbound marketing offers are created equal. Some offer formats perform better than others at converting leads. For example, what’s more valuable: a white paper or an ebook?

Here are the types of lead generation offers, in order of effectiveness, that generate the most amount of leads:

  1. Ebooks or guides
  2. Free templates or presentations
  3. Research and reports
  4. White papers
  5. Workflows and helpful kits
  6. Live webinars
  7. Pre-recorded video series
  8. Blog subscription
  9. Ecourses
  10. Demo requests

Note: It’s important to test different types of offers with your audience to determine what works for you. While ebooks score high on our list, you may find that reports, videos, or other formats work better for you.

Inbound marketing can help you eliminate the challenging and awkward aspects of growing your business like cold calling. Get the year off to a good start. Don’t wait until you’re desperate for leads to consider how you can use inbound marketing to grow your business.

Related: Behaviors of Successful People

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CMG Business Group…. Propelling Industry to New Heights!

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How to Conduct Market Research

If you don’t know your customer, then you don’t know your business. You won’t know how to respond if you see changes in your sales patterns. And because it’s so hard to hang on to customers you don’t know intimately, you will forever be chasing new ones.

Unfortunately, though most business owners like to think they know their customers, many are really only guessing. And when it comes to forecasting sales — in fact, when it comes to virtually every aspect of business planning — an empirical understanding beats gut instinct almost every time. Now is the time to get the facts.

Professional market researchers generally divide their work into qualitative studies (interviews and focus groups, with free-flowing and open-ended discussions) and quantitative studies (usually surveys). In a perfect world, you would probably do both, using qualitative research to create a survey, the results of which might in turn be interpreted using another focus group. Given limited resources, though, it generally makes sense to go quantitative. After all, says Steve Sprague, a marketing consultant in Marion, Iowa, “some data — any data — is better than none.”

Related: Improve Business Profits and Make My Business More Profitable

Building a Better Survey

1. Define Your Survey Target
First, identify the customers to survey. In general, it makes sense to focus on your best customers. “You want to look at the upper 60 percent of your customers by sales,” according to Sprague. Naturally, this is easiest for companies that track purchases and customers individually: Rank your customers by sales and lop off the bottom 40 percent. Alternatively, your sales or accounts receivable staff ought to know who your most reliable buyers are.

Retail shops and other establishments in which purchases are small and buyers tend to remain anonymous may have to settle for a smaller sample from a broader range of customers. But even these businesses can identify their best customers by encouraging customers to fill out a postage-paid postcard with very basic information or by asking them at the register for a Zip code, which can then be used to create a demographic profile. (See “Decoding Demographics.”) You might also institute a frequent-customer program, in which you offer a discount or other incentive in exchange for a small amount of personal information and an opportunity to contact the customer later. Newsletters and e-mail updates are also an opportunity to identify whom to contact later; ditto the prize drawing that requires a business card to enter.

Sometimes you will want to study specific customers. If, say, sales are flagging, you might study lapsed customers. “Identifying characteristics of your attrition market may help you develop new customers and clients,” notes Nancy Ulrich, a marketing research consultant in suburban Jacksonville, Florida.

Related: Staying on Top of Your Social Media

2. Decide on a Format
There are basically three ways to administer a survey: by mail, by phone, or online. A highly personalized letter is best when the survey population is hard to reach (physicians, say, or senior executives). A phone interview serves well for complex and probing questions that demand interaction between interviewer and subject, but it normally requires professional assistance. Most businesses, though, will do very well with an online survey. Many survey companies (Zoomerang.com, for one) offer inexpensive tools and complex branched questions, in which a specific response to one query generates a specific follow-up. And they are fast — you can see results in real time.

Experts say that a written survey should take from five to 15 minutes to complete. Divide your questions between customer satisfaction and customer demographics, weighted toward the former. And keep it short, says Sprague, who includes fewer than 10 questions when he writes surveys for his clients. “By limiting the number of questions, you improve the response rate,” he says. “And it forces you to think about what’s important.”

Be personal, and begin by praising your customer and highlighting the importance of the survey. At the end of the survey, you should offer some sort of reward or incentive — the longer the survey, the more generous the reward.

Related: How to Name Your Business

3. Probe Customer Satisfaction
When writing survey questions, take care to avoid introducing a bias that telegraphs the answers you hope to receive. Avoid trade jargon or abbreviations, or at least make sure they are well defined.

Ask open-ended questions. These let respondents ruminate about what they like about your company and what might improve the relationship. Be sure, says Ulrich, that the text boxes allow space for lengthy responses. Follow these with a multipart rating question and a corresponding multipoint scale to review your business’s specific processes. Ulrich believes that respondents more easily understand descriptive words (excellent, fair, poor, etc.) than a numbered scale.

Calculate your net promoter score. Ask respondents how likely, on a scale from 0 to 10, they are to recommend your company, product, or service to others. The net promoter score is derived by subtracting the percentage of “detractors” (customers who rate the business from 0 to 6) from the percentage of “promoters” (who rate the company 9 or 10). The greater the difference, the more likely that your company can convert the enthusiasm of current customers into new customers. Sites like Net Promoter (netpromoter.com) offer more information about these scores and comparisons with leading companies. Or simply view your score as a useful general indicator of your customers’ feelings about your product or service.

Ask for suggestions. Sprague likes to conclude the customer satisfaction portion of a survey with a query like: “What could we do to make your next experience with us extraordinary?” “It stretches their mind and your mind,” he says. “It’s going to help you think of things you haven’t thought of before.”

Related: The Art of the Pitch

4. Dig for Demographics
The demographic information you seek will depend on which attributes drive your business — these may include age, gender, marital status, educational attainment, household income, and leisure pursuits. Some of these are sensitive topics, and you don’t always need to broach them. For instance, if you know a customer’s Zip code, you can get a rough idea about income and education. If you know the address, you can refine that further by sorting customers into what are called census block groups, says Jeffrey DeBellis, director of marketing and research services at the University of North Carolina’s Small Business and Technology Development Center. (See “Decoding Demographics.”)

When your customers are businesses, you want information about their size by number of employees and revenue. (If your customers are reluctant to share that information, formulate the responses as a series of ranges.) Also, try to get the NAICS (or North American Industry Classification System) or SIC (or Standard Industry Classification, which has been replaced by the NAICS) code. This can help you identify similar companies in the area.

5. Test the Survey First
Before you make the survey available to your customers, ask family members and friends to test it for time and clarity, and whether the questions mean what you intend them to mean and are free of bias and the like.

Related: Seven Secrets of Self-Made Millionaires

Using the Data

Once you tabulate the results (which happens almost immediately with e-survey programs), patterns should emerge. “If you have 20 answers, and you don’t see definite trends, then you probably don’t have enough data,” says Sprague. You could try to resurvey, using the existing results to write more probing and targeted questions, or you could convene a focus group. Focus groups are also useful for interpreting the results.

Focus, focus, focus. For focus-group testing, it is smart to engage experienced marketing consultants, who will be adept at moderating the conversation. For one thing, your subjects will probably be more reticent if you or your top sales executive is conducting the session. “With a trained focus-group facilitator, you’re going to have someone who will generally script the experience up front,” says Ulrich. Moreover, “experienced facilitators develop a certain amount of intuition when something’s up,” sensing when the dynamic has changed and able to steer the conversation in a new direction if necessary.

The “aha” moment. Ulrich recommends that once you have collected all the data, “find one or two ‘aha’ ideas and implement them immediately. Make sure they’re visible and that they impact the greatest number of people in a positive way.” This will show, she says, that you have been listening to the needs and concerns of your customers — which, any great salesperson will tell you, is half the job.

Related: Productivity Tools You Need In Your Toolbox

Decoding Demographics

The Web offers databases and automated services that can help make sense of the survey data you collect. Some are free, but the most useful involve fees or subscriptions. Check with your public library and local “economic gardening” organizations — such as Small Business Development Centers, chambers of commerce, and economic development groups — to see if they offer free or discounted access.

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CMG Business Group…. Propelling Industry to New Heights!

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What to Consider Before You Price Your Products

 

Pricing your products as you launch your small business? It may be worth taking a second look at your pricing strategy.

Sure, you could count your material costs and base your price on that alone, leaving yourself a small profit margin. But have you included the cost of your time and labor? How about transportation, shipping, and taxes?

A holistic approach is necessary to ensure the long-term viability of your business. Failure to consider the full scope of your pricing needs could mean smaller profits, a customer base that dwindles, or even that you might not get a paycheck.

Before you start printing price tags, consider taking an hour to explore a few pricing lessons. The SBA’s Introduction to Pricing self-guided course takes about 30 minutes and illuminates the impact of your pricing strategy on your overall business. SCORE’s Pricing Products and Services webinar lasts about an hour and reviews a variety of pricing scenarios you may encounter.

Whatever your product or service, here are a few items to remember when you’re considering your pricing strategy:

Related: Improve Business Profits and Make My Business More Profitable

Research the market

Developing a pricing system that works for your business requires taking a critical look at both your competitors and your target market. What are customers willing to pay for what you have to offer? Checking out how much they’re paying at your competitors can help you figure out whether it’s best to compete on price, quality, or overall value.

Consider your sales method

Are you selling directly to customers, or wholesaling your products to retailers? Are you paying sales representatives, or closing deals on your own? Direct sales can ensure that more money stays in your business, but your product may have limited reach.

If you’re selling directly to customers, can they purchase online, or in-store only? If the former, you’ll want to consider the costs of shipping supplies in your pricing formula.

Related: Seven Secrets of Self-Made Millionaires

Consider value

If your product or service is unique, don’t feel pressured to lower your price. Instead, focus on the value of your unique product so potential buyers understand what they’ll get for their investment.

Avoid one-size-fits-all pricing

Think about how you like to purchase products or services. Can you offer packages and a la carte buying options for your customers? Having a variety of options ensures that customers find the right fit for them. In addition, offering a package at a slight discount can serve as a low-pressure opportunity to upsell.

Account for sales

If you plan to offer discounts during special promotions, anticipate those discount rates to make sure you won’t lose money during those periods. You may have to raise your prices slightly to account for any discounts offered.

Related: Behaviors of Successful People

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CMG Business Group…. Propelling Industry to New Heights!

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Themes for eCommerce Sites

From merchant accounts to product images, product descriptions, add-on apps and possible integration with your existing website and back-end systems, there are a lot of details to stay on top of when you build an eCommerce site for your small business.

Interestingly however, one of the most critical decisions you need to make is what your new eCommerce site will look and feel like (i.e. its theme). Why is selecting a theme so important? It’s all a matter of cost.

Related: 100 Great Questions Every Entrepreneur Should Ask

The Cost of Customization

The truth is, there are many eCommerce storefronts you can add in minutes. Each of these solutions offers a selection of themes for you to use, some free and some for an additional fee (i.e. premium)

Many of these solutions enable you to customize your theme to some degree (a few even give you full control) however, doing so will take expertise and expertise costs both time and money whether you figure it out for yourself or hire an outside resource to do it for you.

If you’re watching costs, as many small businesses are, then you need to factor in the cost of customization when selecting an eCommerce solution. How? By previewing the free and premium fees as one of your selection criteria:

  • If a solution offers a theme that comes close to your design, that’s a big plus because it will mean less customization efforts.
  • If a solution does not offer a theme that comes close to your design, you will need to explore the cost of customization:
    • How hard will it be for you to learn how to customize your site yourself?
    • How much will it cost to hire an external resource to customize your site?
      • Does the solution vendor provide a list of qualified resources so you don’t have to start from scratch (a cost in terms of time and effort)?

In the end, your ecommerce sites theme is but one of the selection criteria to use when choosing an eCommerce solution, however, it’s often overlooked. Leaving “Compatible Theme” off your checklist can lead to a higher cost, in terms of time, money and frustration, down the road.

Related: Behaviors of Successful People

List of Themes for eCommerce Sites

The more themes a solution offers, or that are offered for that solution by third-parties, the better the odds that you’ll find one that comes close to your design. Start your search for an eCommerce vendor with the following list of themes for eCommerce sites that offer not only great functionality, but also a large selection of both free and premium eCommerce themes.

Shopify

Shopify offers a solid selection of free and premium themes. Its theme store offers many ways to filter and sort their selection including price and industry:

themes for ecommerce sites0

You can also find third-party Shopify themes on sites like ThemeForestTemplateMonsterApolloTheme and RoarTheme.

In addition, Shopify enables you to customize your theme thoroughly and offers a list of experts to help you do so if you chose to go that route.

Related: 10 Small Businesses You Can Start Today With Little To No Money

Bigcommerce

A robust eCommerce platform, Bigcommerce offers a number of free and premium themes today and has big plans to add many more in 2016:

themes for ecommerce sites0

Can’t with for the new themes to be released? You can find third-party themes on sites like TemplateMela and ThemeVale.

Bigcommerce enables you to customize your site’s theme completely and they provide a list of experts to help you design the site you want.

Related: The Art of the Pitch

Volusion

Another robust eCommerce solution, Volusion is perfect for those who want complete control over their site. It has a large selection of free and premium themes and offer customization services as well.

WIX

Born as a simple website creator, WIX has been offering eCommerce functionality for some time. It offers a good set of templates (i.e. themes) for you to use, all of which are included in their pricing plans and many of which were designed for very specific businesses:

themes for ecommerce sites0

WIXs customization functionality is code-free so that’s nice if you want to make changes yourself and not so nice if you want a professional to customize your site.

Related: Words To Get Your Customer’s Attention NOW!

WooCommerce for WordPress

If you want to build your eCommerce site using WordPress, then WooCommerce is a good place to start. While it doesn’t offer a large number of themes on its own, there are hundreds of third-party themes available on sites such as ThemeForest and TemplateMonster.

PrestaShop

PrestaShop is a fully functional eCommerce website solution. It offers many templates, but really shines with the number of third-party themes available on sites like Presthemes, ApolloTheme, ThemeForest and TemplateMonster.

Conclusion

There are many factors to consider when selecting an eCommerce website solution. One of the most critical for small businesses is the number of themes available to use when designing your shop.

Bottom-line: the more themes a solution offers, either itself or via third parties, the better the chance that one will come close to your design. The closer you get, the less time and money you’ll spend on customization.

Related: Improve Business Profits and Make My Business More Profitable

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Develop a Content Marketing Strategy

While some of online marketing is trendy and will inevitably fade away, there’s no disputing that content marketing is here to stay. If you’ve heard this buzzword, but aren’t really clear on what it includes, that’s probably because its definition is expanding as marketers find new ways to provide content to their audience.

In general, content marketing includes:

  • Blogs
  • Videos
  • Infographics
  • Whitepapers/Ebooks

​Related: Improve Business Profits and Make My Business More Profitable

How to Get More Readers (and Thereby Customers)

The point of content marketing is to attract new potential customers to your site. You’re providing useful information to them (in whatever format you choose), and ultimately, you’re working to build trust. Once they feel they can trust you, that relationship moves into the sales funnel.

But first you want to get as many readers or viewers of your content as possible, since they won’t all buy from you. Here’s how.

Share Content on Social Media

Each blog post, video, infographic or ebook you create should be trumpeted through your social network. And not just once! Schedule several updates — across all channels — encouraging your followers to click to view the content you have created. Ask your followers to also share the update with their followers to reach a wider audience.

So what’s the ideal number of times to share? There is none. Just be mindful of your audience, and don’t alienate them by posting multiple updates every day begging them to read your content. A few times a week is a good place to start.

Related: Staying on Top of Your Social Media

Post Content to Bookmarking Sites

For many people, social bookmarking sites like Stumbleupon and BizSugar are where they get their content. The benefit of doing so is that the content has already been vetted, so to speak. The most popular content has the most votes, so a quick skim through the top links should net the best content.

For you, social bookmarking sites offer fabulous opportunity to connect to readers you wouldn’t otherwise have found. The more places you can pick up new readers, the more customers you’ll get.

Set Up an RSS Feed

It needs to be stupidly simple for visitors to your blog to easily get updates every time you post a new article. That’s where RSS feeds come into play. When a visitor signs up to get your blog updates, she can either read them in an RSS feeder with her other favorite blogs, or get your updates via email. That way, she doesn’t have to remember to check back on your blog for new content.

Related: How to Name Your Business

Set Up a Success Measurement Plan

All this hard work in developing and sharing your content will be for naught if you don’t measure results! Paying attention to how many visitors you’re attracting with your content can help you know if you’re doing a good enough job in marketing and sharing that content. And knowing which topics people are reading or viewing the most can help you generate future content ideas.

Google Analytics is the easiest tool to provide data on all of this. Plus, it’s free to use. With Analytics, you can also look at traffic over time and make sure it’s steadily rising the way you want it to. You can also look at conversions, if you sell products online. In other words: is the traffic that’s arriving on your blog converting into paying customers? If not, you should analyze your site to determine the disconnect.

These days, it’s not enough to throw blog content out into cyberspace. You need a plan for your content marketing strategy so you draw in the right people with your content and turn them into loyal customers.

Related: The Art of the Pitch

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Principles of Brand Strategy

In a situation where you’re selling to multiple personalities, it’s best to first connect everyone on a common ground then articulate clearly what’s in it for each of them.

The goal is to stimulate an engaging conversation that allows us to change perception, diagnose expectations and bring clarity to the dialogue.

That’s the essence of developing a brand strategy – the foundation of your communication that builds authentic relationships between you and your audience.

It is by defining your brand strategy that allows you to utilize marketing, advertising, public relations and social media to consistently and accurately reinforce your character.

Without defining the core strategy, all channels of communication can often become a hit and miss expense.

Here’s 12 brand strategy principles I believe to be the key to achieve business success.

Related: Improve Business Profits and Make My Business More Profitable

1. Define your brand

It starts with your authenticity, the core purpose, vision, mission, position, values and character.  Focus on what you do best and then communicated your inimitable strengths through consistency.

There are many examples of companies acquiring other brands but only to sell them off later because they don’t fit within the brand and its architecture.

Microsoft acquired Razorfish in 2007 when it bought aQuantive, a digital marketing services company, for about US $6 billion then sold it a few years later for $530 million.

Simply put, Razorfish isn’t a good fit with Microsoft’s brand strategy.

2.  Your brand is your business model

Supports and challenge your business model to maximize the potential within your brand. Think of personal brands like Oprah, Donald Trump, Martha Stewart and Richard Branson.

These individuals practically built their business right on top of their personal brand; everything they offer is an extension of their brand promise.

Related: Staying on Top of Your Social Media

3. Consistency, consistency, consistency

Consistency in your message is the key to differentiate.

Own your position on every reference point for everything that you do. President Obama focuses on one message only during his campaign, CHANGE. BMW has always been known as the “ultimate driving machine.

4. Start from the Inside out

Everyone in your company can tell you what they see, think and feel about your brand.  That’s the story you should bring to the customers as well, drive impact beyond just the walls of marketing.

That’s example how Zappos empowers employees to strengthen consumer perception on its brand.

5. Connect on the emotional level.

A brand is not a name, logo, website, ad campaigns or PR; those are only the tools not the brand.  A brand is a desirable idea manifested in products, services, people, places and experiences.

Starbucks created a third space experience that’s desirable and exclusive so people would want to stay and pay for the overpriced coffee.

Sell people something that satisfies not only their physical needs but their emotional needs and their need to identify themselves to your brand.

Related: How to Name Your Business

6. Empower brand champions

Award those that love your brand to help drive the message, facility activities so they can be part of the process.

If your brand advocate doesn’t tell you what you should or should not be doing, it’s time to evaluate your brand promise.

Go and talk to someone that works at the Apple retail store or an iPhone owner and you’ll see just how passionate they are about Apple.  It’s a lifestyle and a culture.

7. Stay relevant and flexible

A well managed brand is always making adjustments.  Branding is a process, not a race, not an event so expect to constantly tweak your message and refresh your image.

Successful brands don’t cling to the old ways just because they worked in the past; instead, they try to re-invent themselves by being flexible which frees them to be more savvy and creative.

Here is an example: when the economy tanked this year automaker Hyundai came out with an assurance program that lets you return your car if you lose your job with no further financial obligation and no damage to your credit.

The results?

As of end of February, only two buyers have taken advantage of this program but it has boosted their sales by 14% year-over-year in Q1, only one of the two companies increased revenue while companies such as Honda experienced a drop of more than 30%.

Follow by that campaign in July, as gas prices expected to push higher during peak summer travel months, Hyundai came out with another program that guarantees a year’s worth of gas at $1.49 per gallon on most models.

Related: The Art of the Pitch

8. Align tactics with strategy

Convey the brand message on the most appropriate media platform with specific campaign objectives.

Because consumers are bombarded by commercial messages everyday, they’re also actively blocking out the great majority of them.

Invest your branding efforts on the right platform that communicates to the right channels.

Television may be expensive but it has a broader reach, wider demographics and can produce instant impact.  On the other hand, social media may seem cheap but it takes time, resources and may not give you the desire outcome.

9. Measure the effectiveness

Focus on the ROI (return on investment) is the key to measure the effectiveness of your strategies.

Often times it is how well your organization can be inspired to execute the strategies. It could also be reflected in brand valuation or how your customers react to your product and price adjustments.

Ultimately it should resonate with sales and that means profitability.  But don’t just focus increasing sales when you could be getting a profit boost by reducing overheads and expenses as well.

Give yourself options to test different marketing tactics, make sure they fit your brand authenticity and aligns with your strategy.

Related: Seven Secrets of Self-Made Millionaires

10. Cultivate your community

Community is a powerful and effective platform on which to engage customers and create loyalty towards the brand.

In an active community, members feel a need to connect with each other in the context of the brand’s consumption.

We all want to be an insider of something, it excites us to tell people which community we’re part of and what knowledge we posses.

In many ways it’s our ego that prides us to be part of a sports team or a professional group.

Guess what car would members of the Porsche club consider first when it’s time to purchase their next vehicle?

Brand communities allow companies to collaborate with customers in all phases of value creation via crowdsourcing such as product design, pricing strategy, availability, and even how to sell.

Related: Productivity Tools You Need In Your Toolbox

11. Keep your enemies closer

Even if you have the most innovative, highly desirable product, you can expect new competitors with a superior value proposition to enter your market down the road.

The market is always big enough for new players to improve what you deliver better, faster, cheaper. Call it hypercompetition or innovation economics, competition could be good for you believe it or not.

It challenges you brand to elevate the strategy and deliver more value.

Just look at how the Big Three (automobile manufacturers General Motors, Ford, and Chrysler) got crushed in the past decade by competitions from Germany and Japanese.

Not only do their competitors make a better product, they’re more efficient doing it and command a higher brand loyalty.

In 2008, Toyota overtook GM while Honda passed Chrysler in US sales.

Related: Words To Get Your Customer’s Attention NOW!

12. Practice brand strategy thinking

IDEO’s CEO Tim Brown calls design thinking “a process for creating new choices.

Essentially it means to not just settle for the choices currently available but to think outside the box without being limited.

This concept actually applies to your brand strategy creation process that I called brand strategy thinking.

It’s always easier to execute tactics than coming up with a strategy because it implies the possibility of failure.

It’s much faster to emulate what worked for your competitor than to come up with something original and creative.

But the truth is, that’s not you and it violates the first principle of brand strategy.  Brand strategy thinking is about creating the right experience that involve all the stakeholders to foster a better strategy.

Leverage the ecosystem that includes your employees, partners and customers to help you articulate your brand strategy so they sync together.

The take away: Having a brand strategy will bring clarity and meaning to your brand so you can focus on making, creating, and selling things that people actually care about.

If you could do that, your brand would be unique and memorable on its way to become an esteemed brand.

Related: Behaviors of Successful People

Credit: Kanika Sharma

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CMG Business Group…. Propelling Industry to New Heights!

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Target Your Market!

Given the current state of the economy, having a well-defined target market is more important than ever. No one can afford to target everyone. Small businesses can effectively compete with large companies by targeting a niche market.

Many businesses say they target “anyone interested in my services.” Some say they target small business owners, homeowners, or stay-at-home moms. All of these targets are too general.

Targeting a specific market does not mean that you are excluding people who do not fit your criteria. Rather, target marketing allows you to focus your marketing dollars and brand message on a specific market that is more likely to buy from you than other markets. This is a much more affordable, efficient, and effective way to reach potential clients and generate business.

For example, an interior design company could choose to market to homeowners between the ages of 35 and 65 with incomes of $150,000-plus in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. To define the market even further, the company could choose to target only those interested in kitchen and bath remodeling and traditional styles. This market could be broken down into two niches: parents on the go and retiring baby boomers.

With a clearly defined target audience, it is much easier to determine where and how to market your company. Here are some tips to help you define your target market.

Look at your current customer base.

Who are your current customers, and why do they buy from you? Look for common characteristics and interests. Which ones bring in the most business? It is very likely that other people like them could also benefit from your product/service.

Related: The Art of the Pitch

Check out your competition.

Who are your competitors targeting? Who are their current customers? Don’t go after the same market. You may find a niche market that they are overlooking.

Analyze your product/service.

Write out a list of each feature of your product or service. Next to each feature, list the benefits it provides (and the benefits of those benefits). For example, a graphic designer offers high-quality design services. The benefit is a professional company image. A professional image will attract more customers because they see the company as professional and trustworthy. So ultimately, the benefit of high-quality design is gaining more customers and making more money.

Once you have your benefits listed, make a list of people who have a need that your benefit fulfills. For example, a graphic designer could choose to target businesses interested in increasing their client base. While this is still too general, you now have a base to start from.

Related: How to Name Your Business

Choose specific demographics to target.

Figure out not only who has a need for your product or service, but also who is most likely to buy it. Think about the following factors:

  • Age
  • Location
  • Gender
  • Income level
  • Education level
  • Marital or family status
  • Occupation
  • Ethnic background

Consider the psychographics of your target.

Psychographics are the more personal characteristics of a person, including:

  • Personality
  • Attitudes
  • Values
  • Interests/hobbies
  • Lifestyles
  • Behavior

Determine how your product or service will fit into your target’s lifestyle. How and when will your target use the product? What features are most appealing to your target? What media does your target turn to for information? Does your target read the newspaper, search online, or attend particular events?

Related: Staying on Top of Your Social Media

Evaluate your decision.

Once you’ve decided on a target market, be sure to consider these questions:

  • Are there enough people that fit my criteria?
  • Will my target really benefit from my product/service? Will they see a need for it?
  • Do I understand what drives my target to make decisions?
  • Can they afford my product/service?
  • Can I reach them with my message? Are they easily accessible?

Don’t break your target down too far! Remember, you can have more than one niche market. Consider if your marketing message should be different for each niche market. If you can reach both niches effectively with the same message, then maybe you have broken down your market too far. Also, if you find that there are only 50 people that fit all of your criteria, maybe you should reevaluate your target. The trick is to find that perfect balance.

You may be asking, “How do I find all this information?” Try searching online for research others have done on your target. Search for magazine articles and blogs that talk about your target market or that talk to your target market. Search for blogs and forums where people in your target market communicate their opinions. Look for survey results, or consider conducting a survey of your own. Ask your current customers for feedback.

Defining your target market is the hard part. Once you know who you are targeting, it is much easier to figure out which media you can use to reach them and what marketing messages will resonate with them. Instead of sending direct mail to everyone in your ZIP code, you can send only to those who fit your criteria. Save money and get a better return on investment by defining your target audience.

Related: Improve Business Profits and Make My Business More Profitable

Additional resources.

Pew Internet publishes reports regarding internet use among various demographics.

Scarborough issues press releases with useful data and sometimes publishes free studies.

Also look for free studies by Arbitron. You may be surprised what you can find just by doing a search in Google.

Credit: Mandy Porta via The Inc.

Photo Credit: Blogs.UBC.CA

CMG Business Group…. Propelling Industry to New Heights!

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Staying on Top of Your Social Media

1. Define an Objective

Why are you monitoring? If the answer is “because everyone’s doing it,” you are in trouble. You need to have a clear goal in mind, such as:

  • I want to monitor because I want to be alerted immediately when people are saying bad / good things about my brand.
  • I want to quickly respond to all customer service queries, and I’m going to set up a way to collaborate and exchange information seamlessly with my support team.
  • I’m monitoring so I can quickly see who is talking about [insert industry keyword] and join the conversation to bring more credibility to my brand.
  • I’m monitoring so I can keep my finger on the pulse of the market so I can figure out what the market actually needs and then create it.
  • I’m monitoring so I can easily identify people in need of my product and help them at the point of need.
  • All of the above, and more!

Having an end goal in mind will help you target your resources correctly, select the right tool for the job and be more effective in the end.

2. Decide Where to Monitor

Social media is relationship and conversation media. At its core is the art of building relationships with others, human-to-human. However, you can’t be everywhere conversing with everyone at the same time. You need to pick your battles. Where you “hang out” digitally, just like any outreach and marketing program, should be driven by where your constituency hangs out. The notion of the social customer should reflect not only your current paying customers, but also potential customers and industry thought leaders. Monitoring can help you figure out where these people are, and therefore what channels are best for you to listen to and engage.

Related: Tools for Efficient Management of Your Ecommerce Startup

3. Decide What to Monitor

Recall that monitoring is keyword-based, and thus selection of the right keywords is important. At the very least, you should be tracking your company name, brand names, product names, names of key execs, competitor names, competitive product names, industry keywords, and your tagline or most recent marketing efforts (e.g. Did you run a special promotion for Mother’s day?).

4. Prioritize

Social media is voluminous –- conversations are happening across many channels and social networks all over the world. To make matters even more complicated, the signal-to-noise ratio is not in your favor. This is why your monitoring must be intelligent and actionable. You should be triaging all the social media messages that come across your field of vision, so that you can focus on what’s most important. If you work in a large, matrixed organization, you need to separate by product or brand and type of message (service vs. feedback).

Related: Make The Entrepreneurial Difference

5. Develop a Plan

To expand on the previous tip, you need to develop a crisis management plan. Don’t let Nestle’s Facebook Page issues happen to you. You should also develop a plan for engagement in more routine situations. When a blogger raves about your product, how do you turn this goodwill into collaboration that benefits both parties? How do you create customer advocacy programs? How do you internalize and execute on feedback about your (or competitor’s) product? How do you deal with irate customers? What about irate bloggers? You need to think through all these scenarios and figure out how you will activate the right resources within the organization.

6. Involve Others

Social media information is bigger and faster than any other information channel we’ve had before. Here lies the challenge: With the speed of a tweet, how do you tap the right person in the organization to either answer the query or help you answer it? However you disseminate information, you need to think about the following:

  • How does data flow?
  • How are people notified that their help is needed? Is this done through e-mail or IM alerts? Push notifications? Dashboards?
  • How quickly are the right parties notified?
  • How is the information cascaded?
  • Are functional experts engaging themselves or funneling the answers through the social media ambassador?
  • After the interaction happens, how is the customer record updated and shared? How is it related to the rest of the customer record (e-mails, call center notes)?

Related: Improve Business Profits and Make My Business More Profitable

7. Listen First

Let’s say you did some monitoring and identified a certain community as the place to be. Should you just jump in and start chatting and plugging your product from the get-go? Absolutely not!

Before you ever open your digital mouth, listen and observe the culture of the community, interactions between members, how influence is expressed, and even if there’s a particular vernacular. The community can be private or open, but regardless of where the community “resides,” you need to get to know its members, stakeholders, and community norms.

8. Inbound vs. Outbound Conversations

“Outbound” does not mean screaming your message at the top of your Twitter lungs. Outbound simply means that you are proactively going out there and participating in discussions around your area of expertise. For example, I actively seek out discussions on social media monitoring and Social CRM, among others.

Conversely, “inbound” in the context of monitoring simply means that people are talking directly to you or about you with specific end goals in mind –- they either need help, want to give you feedback, or leave a compliment.

The reason I bring up inbound vs. outbound is because both have distinct rules of engagement. When you are participating in a larger discussion, it’s not usually appropriate to throw out links to your product demo left and right. Just because someone utters a keyword doesn’t mean they want to go to your homepage.

However, when it’s an inbound communication, the user is probably looking for something specific to your company, which makes it more acceptable to share relevant links. There are no hard and fast rules about what’s appropriate, but get a feeling for what feels right after listening first, and just use common sense.

Related: Words To Get Your Customer’s Attention NOW!

9. Build Relationships

As you identify the spheres of influence and group dynamics in step #7, make sure you are forming relationships with the thought leaders around you. Take a minute to identify influencers and figure out who is driving the conversation.

But be wary of defining influence as a sheer function of reach. After you find these thought leaders, take the time to read them and understand their viewpoints before you ever pitch anything. Growing and nurturing these relationships is the art of any social business. Comment on their blogs, chat with them digitally, get to know them personally and professionally, and meet them in person at a conference. Never go into a conversation asking yourself how useful someone can be to you. When you develop a voice and become a resource for others, people will listen to you and spread your message on the merits of the message. The true definition of influence is when you don’t even have to ask others to do that.

10. Select Tools that Match your Strategy

tools image

If you identified Twitter as the area of focus based on your research in step #2, you should select a monitoring tool that’s strong in Twitter. If you want to track conversations in multiple languages, look for that capability. Your checklist of what you need in a tool is going to be largely driven by your purpose definition in step #1. You need to know where you are heading and why, so that you can decide whether you want historical or archivable data, charting and sharing capabilities, advanced analytics, free or premium model, depth of coverage, sentiment analytics, easy integration with existing systems, or whatever else you may need.

It’s not an easy task, so I encourage you to do your homework, ask vendors the tough questions, and never lose sight of your objective.

How do you monitor and engage? What are some best practices you’ve developed? What are some things that worked or didn’t work? Be sure to share your insights in the comments.

Related: Productivity Tools You Need In Your Toolbox

Credit: Maria Ogneva via Mashable

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CMG Business Group…. Propelling Industry to New Heights!

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Words To Get Your Customer’s Attention NOW!

 

“Join us!”

“Sign up!”

These phrases litter the huge variety of email newsletter boxes you’ll come across online, and they generally serve the same purpose: Click here to give us your email address. They serve the same purpose, but do they say the same thing?

Can one word change the way you feel about a button?

 

In my experience, yes. I subscribe to the copywriting school of thought where every single word is absolutely worth stewing over and A/B testing because one single word can change everything. The difference between “joining” and “signing up” is the difference between fellowship and enlisting. A word changes the meaning, the mood, and the motivation.

Related: The Art of the Pitch

189 Words That Get Your Customer's Attention Every Time

To connect the dots then, you’re probably wondering: If a single word makes that much difference, then what words should I be using? Which words and phrases convert?

The science of copywriting, the psychology of headlines, and the art of CTAs has revealed quite a number of go-to moves for marketers looking to gain a linguistic edge in their words and pitches. I’ve enjoyed saving several lists of these so-called power words and pulling them out to use in a pinch. I’m happy to share my lists with you of the phrases and words that convert . Do you have any power words that work magic for you? I’d love to hear about them in the comments.

Related: How to Start a Consulting Business

Research reveals how a single word makes all the difference

 

You likely know inherently that specific words matter. You click on a headline because a single word strikes you. You click a signup button because a word creates an emotion.

The research behind this power of words is incredibly deep. Researchers have found that the word you use to describe a car accident (“contacted” vs. “smashed”) paints the way eyewitnesses view the event. Another study found that simple stock names that are easier to pronounce lead to quicker gains post-IPO.

Perhaps my favorite study is one shared by Brian Clark of Copyblogger. Social psychologist Ellen Langer tested the power of a single word in an experiment where she asked to cut in line at a copy machine. She tried three different ways of asking:

“Excuse me, I have five pages. May I use the Xerox machine?” – 60% said OK

“Excuse me, I have five pages. May I use the Xerox machine becauseI’m in a rush?” – 94% said OK

“Excuse me, I have five pages. May I use the Xerox machine because I have to make some copies?” – 93% said OK

I don’t know about you, but I thought Langer’s third request was rather elementary. Yet it didn’t matter. The trigger word “because” was all she needed. The takeaway: When you want people to take action, always give a reason.

Related: Quick, Easy Ways to Improve Your Focus

Neurologically, we have an instinctual reaction to words and language. Researchers have found that we are hardwired to associate sounds with images, even in words we do not comprehend. Here’s a test for you, pulled from a study by Wolfgang K?hler. Which of the two shapes below is a maluma and which is a takete?

189 Words That Get Your Customer's Attention Every Time

The vast majority of respondents label the smooth, rounded image a maluma and the hard, jagged image a takete.

To go one step further into the power of words, you can look at Patrick Renvoise and Christopher Morin’s book about neuromarketing (see Peep Laja’s article at ConversionXL for a great analysis of the book). Renvoise and Morin highlight the three different brains we have: the new brain, the middle brain, and the old brain.

189 Words That Get Your Customer's Attention Every Time

The old brain is the part that controls decisions, and it also happens to be the most primitive. In this way, the words you use to market to the old brain will often be the most direct, simple, arresting, visual words you have.

You’ll likely see a lot of these “old brain” words in the lists below.

Related: 10 Small Businesses You Can Start Today With Little To No Money

The ultimate list of words and phrases that convert

 

A quick Google search can reveal pages of results for persuasive and powerful words. There’s no trouble finding them; there’s sometimes trouble applying them. The words you see below are split into a number of categories, along with some ideas on how I’ve used them in the past (and how you can use them, too).

189 Words That Get Your Customer's Attention Every Time

Related: Seven Secrets of Self-Made Millionaires

The 5 most persuasive words in the English language

  • You
  • Free
  • Because
  • Instantly
  • New

You’ve seen these words countless times before–and for good reason. The research behind these words has shown over and over that they work. Gregory Ciotti wrote about these five in a post for Copyblogger, showing exactly how each is vital for persuasive speech and copy. For instance, immediate words like “instantly” trigger mid-brain activity and feed our zest for quick gratification.

Where to try these words: Calls-to-action, headlines, email subject lines, headings, opening sentences and paragraphs

The 20 most influential words, via David Ogilvy

  • Suddenly
  • Now
  • Announcing
  • Introducing
  • Improvement
  • Amazing
  • Sensational
  • Remarkable
  • Revolutionary
  • Startling
  • Miracle
  • Magic
  • Offer
  • Quick
  • Easy
  • Wanted
  • Challenge
  • Compare
  • Bargain
  • Hurry

David Ogilvy is to advertising as Jimi Hendrix is to the electric guitar. His list of influential words you see above was first published in 1963, and many remain in vogue today.

Related: Productivity Tools You Need In Your Toolbox

Where to try these: Headlines, bullet points, subject lines

(Sidenote: For a fun blast from the past, courtesy of Ben Locker, here are a couple advertisements for power words that date back to 1961. A New York Times ad is on the left, a Washington Post ad is on the right. Ogilvy’s 20 influential words came out two years after these.)

189 Words That Get Your Customer's Attention Every Time

3 words to encourage community

  • Join
  • Become a member
  • Come along

Related: Behaviors of Successful People

These community phrases provide a sense of togetherness to the user; they feel like they’re taking part in something larger than themselves. (You’ll notice that we use the word “join” in our email newsletter form.)

Where to try these words: Email signups, trial offers, in-app messaging

10 cause-and-effect words and phrases

  • Accordingly
  • As a result
  • Because
  • Caused by
  • Consequently
  • Due to
  • For this reason
  • Since
  • Therefore
  • Thus

Author Darlene Price, the originator of this cause-and-effect list, has great insight into what makes these cause-and-effect phrases so useful: “Cause-and-effect words make your claims sound objective and rational rather than biased and subjective.”

Related: 100 Great Questions Every Entrepreneur Should Ask

Where to try these: Closing paragraphs, transitions

12 phrases that imply exclusivity

  • Members only
  • Login required
  • Class full
  • Membership now closed
  • Ask for an invitation
  • Apply to be one of our beta testers
  • Exclusive offers
  • Become an insider
  • Be one of the few
  • Get it before everybody else
  • Be the first to hear about it
  • Only available to subscribers

Garrett Moon of CoSchedule explains exclusivity as being like a club with membership restrictions. You want in because others are in. There’s a bit of social pressure with exclusivity wording, and it helps drive decisions and actions for the user.

Where to try these: Signup forms, links, calls-to-action, subheads

9 phrases that imply scarcity

  • Limited offer
  • Supplies running out
  • Get them while they last
  • Sale ends soon
  • Today only
  • Only 10 available
  • Only 3 left
  • Only available here
  • Double the offer in the next hour only

The fear of missing out (often abbreviated as FOMO) is a common driver of action for marketers and advertisers. FOMO is essentially scarcity. By showing that an item or product is in limited supply, you hope to ratchet up demand.

Where to try these: Headings, promo copy

Related: 10 Common Career Killers

28 words and phrases that make you feel safe

  • Anonymous
  • Authentic
  • Backed
  • Best-selling
  • Cancel Anytime
  • Certified
  • Endorsed
  • Guaranteed
  • Ironclad
  • Lifetime
  • Moneyback
  • No Obligation
  • No Questions Asked
  • No Risk
  • No Strings Attached
  • Official
  • Privacy
  • Protected
  • Proven
  • Recession-proof
  • Refund
  • Research
  • Results
  • Secure
  • Tested
  • Try before You Buy
  • Verify
  • Unconditional

Boost Blog Traffic’s Jon Morrow collected a huge list of power words(his full list of 317 is well worth the read) and sorted the list by category. The above section is Morrow’s grouping of words that engender feelings of safety. It’s my favorite group from Morrow’s list because these safety words have an amazing effect on the person reading: They create trust.

Where to try these: Payment forms, signup forms, testimonials

Related: Words To Get Your Customer’s Attention NOW!

48 ubiquitous power words

  • Improve
  • Trust
  • Immediately
  • Discover
  • Profit
  • Learn
  • Know
  • Understand
  • Powerful
  • Best
  • Win
  • Hot Special
  • More
  • Bonus
  • Exclusive
  • Extra
  • You
  • Free
  • Health
  • Guarantee
  • New
  • Proven
  • Safety
  • Money
  • Now
  • Today
  • Results
  • Protect
  • Help
  • Easy
  • Amazing
  • Latest
  • Extraordinary
  • How to
  • Worst
  • Ultimate
  • Hot
  • First
  • Big
  • Anniversary
  • Premiere
  • Basic
  • Complete
  • Save
  • Plus!
  • Create

Related: Make The Entrepreneurial Difference

Each employee on the circulation and email marketing teams at Interweave Press has these words printed and posted on their wall. The list, which was originally compiled Linda Ruth and Curtis Circulation Company, came from studying best-selling magazine covers, and Interweave’s Bob Kaslik found that the words work equally well on magazines as they do in promo copy and in email subject lines.

Where to try these: Email subject lines, headlines, calls-to-action

9 word for shareable content

  • Secret
  • Tell us
  • Inspires
  • Take
  • Help
  • Promote
  • Increase
  • Create
  • Discover

Neil Patel put together the infographic you see below, based on research on each of the four major social networks: Twitter, Facebook, Google+, and LinkedIn. His list represents the words that can get your content shared on social media. I’ve found success grouping some of these words with other power words as well.

Related: Your Startup is up and running. What now?

 

189 Words That Get Your Customer's Attention Every Time

 

Related: Marketing Tools Entrepreneurs Should Keep Handy

Create and share your own list

If you’re looking for inspiration (and a few unique power words to keep in your toolbox), try keeping track of the words that get you to convert. Take note of the words and phrases that grab your attention. Keep in mind why a headline stands out more than another. Notice which words grab you in a bullet list of benefits.

As you find new words, you can build a list in Evernote or another note-taking app; then be sure to reference them when you’re in a pinch and looking for a powerful addition to your headline, copy, or post.

Credit: Kevan Lee of Buffer

Photo Credit: YieldFans.BlogSpot .com

CMG Business Group…. Propelling Industry to New Heights!

 

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